.danhill

.danhill

I write comics. I write about comics. I edit comics.

Check 'em out here.

I just finished watching A Hijacking.

This is a much more nuanced affair than Captain Phillips, digging much deeper into the psychology of both negotiation, and being held captive for a prolonged period of time (120 days!).

The editing choices are clever, only adding to the taut atmosphere. It often cuts away from a scene, changing location entirely. We are left to figure out what has gone on by reading the reactions and dialogue of the characters in the next scene.

Noise and sound are important too. Back in Denmark there are often long shots, lingering on almost empty, cold looking offices. Patches of silence punctuate these scenes as men are left to contemplate what their decisions may yield.

The ship itself is often a cacophony of noise, with machinery and the constant chatter of the Somalian pirates simmering away in the background, setting us on edge. In the early days of the ordeal gunfire will often erupt before the ship falls quiet again.

There’s as much time spent in the boardroom and offices of the shipping company as there is on the hijacked tanker itself.

At first, the steely CEO tries to negotiate it like he would any other business deal. But it soon becomes apparent he’s dealing with desperate, unpredictable people. Business 101 has no place here.

We’re even encouraged to sympathise with the him as the mental stress begins to weigh heavy on his shoulders, the lives of the crew in his hands.

There are no Navy Seal teams here to help the crew. No towering, showy central performance. This is an ensemble piece, a movie about a negotiation between two factions, doing their best to get the most out of a shitty situation, and where anything could happen.
I just finished watching A Hijacking.

This is a much more nuanced affair than Captain Phillips, digging much deeper into the psychology of both negotiation, and being held captive for a prolonged period of time (120 days!).

The editing choices are clever, only adding to the taut atmosphere. It often cuts away from a scene, changing location entirely. We are left to figure out what has gone on by reading the reactions and dialogue of the characters in the next scene.

Noise and sound are important too. Back in Denmark there are often long shots, lingering on almost empty, cold looking offices. Patches of silence punctuate these scenes as men are left to contemplate what their decisions may yield.

The ship itself is often a cacophony of noise, with machinery and the constant chatter of the Somalian pirates simmering away in the background, setting us on edge. In the early days of the ordeal gunfire will often erupt before the ship falls quiet again.

There’s as much time spent in the boardroom and offices of the shipping company as there is on the hijacked tanker itself.

At first, the steely CEO tries to negotiate it like he would any other business deal. But it soon becomes apparent he’s dealing with desperate, unpredictable people. Business 101 has no place here.

We’re even encouraged to sympathise with the him as the mental stress begins to weigh heavy on his shoulders, the lives of the crew in his hands.

There are no Navy Seal teams here to help the crew. No towering, showy central performance. This is an ensemble piece, a movie about a negotiation between two factions, doing their best to get the most out of a shitty situation, and where anything could happen.

I just finished watching A Hijacking.

This is a much more nuanced affair than Captain Phillips, digging much deeper into the psychology of both negotiation, and being held captive for a prolonged period of time (120 days!).

The editing choices are clever, only adding to the taut atmosphere. It often cuts away from a scene, changing location entirely. We are left to figure out what has gone on by reading the reactions and dialogue of the characters in the next scene.

Noise and sound are important too. Back in Denmark there are often long shots, lingering on almost empty, cold looking offices. Patches of silence punctuate these scenes as men are left to contemplate what their decisions may yield.

The ship itself is often a cacophony of noise, with machinery and the constant chatter of the Somalian pirates simmering away in the background, setting us on edge. In the early days of the ordeal gunfire will often erupt before the ship falls quiet again.

There’s as much time spent in the boardroom and offices of the shipping company as there is on the hijacked tanker itself.

At first, the steely CEO tries to negotiate it like he would any other business deal. But it soon becomes apparent he’s dealing with desperate, unpredictable people. Business 101 has no place here.

We’re even encouraged to sympathise with the him as the mental stress begins to weigh heavy on his shoulders, the lives of the crew in his hands.

There are no Navy Seal teams here to help the crew. No towering, showy central performance. This is an ensemble piece, a movie about a negotiation between two factions, doing their best to get the most out of a shitty situation, and where anything could happen.

Links 28/08/14

One Year Later: Elysium

A nice look back at Blomkamp’s follow up effort to District 9. It touches on one of the issues I had with the movie, namely the casting.

[How Movies Manipulate Your Brain to Keep You Entertained]((http://www.wired.com/2014/08/how-movies-manipulate-your-brain/)

Interesting, if short, piece on practical effects versus computer, perception and where things sit in the frame.

The Aftershocks

Seven of Italy’s top scientists were convicted of manslaughter following a catastrophic quake. What follows is a travesty of justice and the problems with human perception when it comes to natural disasters.

An Oral History of “Dazed and Confused”

Alright, alright, alright.

How Social Media Silences Debate

More of that filter bubble, plus a little fear of rocking the boat.

Lost (Classic): “Exodus”

AV Club have been revisiting Lost. This recap of the Season 1 finale touches on everything great about the show, and proof enough that it was always about the characters.

Links 27/08/14

They Helped Make BioShock. Their Next Game Will Be Even More Surreal

"In the game, you experiment in altering the pasts of three resident creators performing at the Equinox. There’s the Artist (a woman named Marisol) the Filmmaker director (Avery Arnault) and the Musical Act (a band called Many Embers). "Your goal is to improve their works in the present," Fielder says. "And you have to satisfy the whims of the creator, the Critic and the Crowd and they’ll hint at what should change next. So the story’s really tied intrinsically into the gameplay."

Well, I’m sold.

HULK’S FAVORITE MOVIES: DO THE RIGHT THING (1989)

Film Crit Hulk on why this movie still matters.

Video Games, Misogyny, And Terrorism: A Guide To Assholes

This overlaps with elements of comics fandom.

Bonus: Read this too.

How Mercenaries and Gun Culture Shaped One of the Best Strategy Games Ever Made

I am a huge nerd for the Jagged Alliance series.